Authors

James Aitchison

James Aitchison

James Aitchison was born in Stirlingshire in 1938. He has published six collections of poems: Sounds Before Sleep, Spheres, Second Nature, Brain Scans, Bird-Score and Foraging: New and Selected Poems (Worple, 2009). He is the author of the critical study, The Golden Harvester: The Vision of Edwin Muir.

His articles on the creative process and poetics have appeared in Acumen, Agenda, The Dark Horse, The David Jones Journal and The Philosopher.

Beverley Bie Brahic

Beverley Bie Brahic

Beverley Bie Brahic is Canadian; she lives in Paris and Stanford, California. She has published two collections of poems: Against Gravity and White Sheets, a PBS Recommendation and finalist for the Forward Prize. Also a translator, she has published books of poetry by Apollinaire, Francis Ponge (Unfinished Ode to Mud, a finalist for the Popescu Prize) Yves Bonnefoy. Prose translations include books by Hélène Cixous, Jacques Derrida and Julia Kristeva.

Stephen Boyce

Stephen Boyce

Stephen Boyce lives in Dorset. His poems have appeared in Magma, Staple, The Interpreter’s House, Frogmore Papers, Smiths Knoll, Tears in the Fence, Ink, Sweat & Tears, Acumen and other journals, as well as in various anthologies. He has been a prizewinner in the Kent & Sussex, Leicester, Ledbury, Ware Poets and Plough Prize competitions. His collection Desire Lines (Arrowhead Press 2010) was described by Katherine Gallagher as “intelligent, sophisticated, formally assured… a truly exciting new voice”. Worple published his collection The Sisyphus Dog in 2014. He is a trustee of Winchester Poetry Festival.

www.stephenboycepoetry.co.uk.

Andy Brown

Andy Brown

Andy Brown’s most recent book of poems is Exurbia (Worple Press 2014). He also collaborated with David Morley on the Worple Press collection Of Science.  Previous books include The Fool and the Physician, Goose Music (with John Burnside), and Fall of the Rebel Angels (all Salt). A selection of his poems appears in the Bloodaxe anthology Identity Parade. He recently edited The Writing Occurs As Song: A Kelvin Corcoran Reader (Shearsman 2014) and is co-editing, A Body of Work: Poetry and Medical Writing, with Corinna Wagner, for Bloomsbury (2015). He is Director of the Exeter University Creative Writing Programme and was formerly an Arvon Foundation Centre Director.

Olivia Byard

Olivia Byard

Olivia Byard was born in South Wales and grew up on the Cotswolds and in Montreal, Canada. Her various roles have included factory worker, academic researcher, community organiser, children’s book writer, book controller, phone advisor for Mind, and, for the last twenty-one years, creative writing tutor. She is politically engaged, especially on Green issues. She comments online and her letters regularly appear in the Guardian.

Elizabeth Cook

Elizabeth Cook

Elizabeth Cook was born in Gibraltar in 1952, spent her childhood in Nigeria and Dorset, and now lives in East London and Suffolk. She is the editor of the Oxford Authors John Keats and author of Achilles (Methuen and Picador USA), a work of fiction with a performance life, acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic. Her poetry, short fiction and critical reviews have appeared in many journals including Agenda, The London Review of Books, Poetry London, Stand, Moving Worlds and Tears in the Fence. She has been a Hawthornden Fellow and wrote the libretto for Francis Grier’s The Passion of Jesus of Nazareth, jointly commissioned by VocalEssence in Minneapolis and the BBC. She has since collaborated with him on a sequence of poems for a Vespers which premiered in 2014 at King’s College Chapel.

Belinda Cooke

Belinda Cooke was born in Reading in 1957 and took a degree in English/Russian at Liverpool University. She has published one collection of poetry, Resting Place (Flarestack 2007), and a collection of translations, Paths of the Beggar Woman: the Selected Poems of Marina Tsvetaeva (Worple Press 2008). Boris Poplavsky’s Flags, produced in collaboration with Richard McKane, was published by Shearsman Press (2009); they later collaborated on Boris Pasternak’s Zhivago Poems and Other Later Poems.

Martyn Crucefix

Martyn Crucefix

Martyn Crucefix has won numerous prizes including a major Eric Gregory award and a Hawthornden Fellowship. He has published 5 collections of poetry; the latest, Hurt, was published by Enitharmon in 2010. His translation of Rilke’s Duino Elegies in 2006, shortlisted for the Popescu Prize for European Poetry Translation, was hailed as “unlikely to be bettered for very many years” (Magma). His new translation of Rilke’s The Sonnets to Orpheus appeared in 2012.

Sally Flint

Sally Flint

Sally Flint grew up in the West Midlands and now lives in Exeter. Her poetry and prose have been widely published, anthologised and won awards. She teaches creative writing, facilitates community workshops and is co-founder/editor of Riptide short story journal and Canto Poetry at the University of Exeter. She also works with Devon Drugs Service and Devon Community Foundation on a project ‘Stories Connect’, based on the University of Massachusetts’ programme, ‘Changing Lives through Literature.’ Her research interests include healthcare in the arts, and the evolution of ekphrasis, especially the relationship between poetry, visual art and technology.

John Freeman

John Freeman

John Freeman was born in Essex, grew up in South London and studied English at Cambridge. He lived in Yorkshire before moving to Wales where he teaches at Cardiff University. He has published two collections with Worple Press, A Suite For Summer  (2007) and What Possessed Me (2016), his tenth collection of poems.  Other collections include The Light Is Of Love, I Think: New and Selected Poems (Stride), and Landscape With Portraits (Redbeck). Stride also published a book of essays, The Less Received: Neglected Modern Poets. The essay ‘We Must Talk Now’ appeared in Cusp: recollections of poetry in transition, edited by Geraldine Monk (Shearsman, 2012). In 2013 John Freeman won third prize in the National Poetry Competition.


Isabel Galleymore

Isabel Galleymore

Isabel Galleymore was born in 1988. She held a Hawthornden Fellowship in 2012 and her poems have appeared in magazines such as Poetry Review, Poetry London and The Rialto. She is currently writing her critical PhD thesis on metaphor and ecopoetics at the University of Exeter and co-edits The Clearing, an online magazine of nature and place-based writing.

John Greening

John Greening

Born in Chiswick in 1954, John Greening has lived in Upper Egypt, New Jersey, Mannheim, Arbroath but chiefly in Huntingdonshire, where he teaches. He has published more than a dozen collections (including Hunts, Poems 1979-2009 and To the War Poets (OxfordPoets, 2013)) and several critical studies – of Yeats, Ted Hughes, Hardy, Edward Thomas, First World War Poets and the Elizabethans. His most recent book is a guide to the art: Poetry Masterclass. A regular reviewer with the TLS and a judge for the Eric Gregory Awards, Greening has received the Bridport Prize, the TLS Centenary Prize and a Cholmondeley Award for his poetry. His collection Knot was published by Worple in 2013.
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Kevin Jackson

Kevin Jackson

Kevin Jackson is an English writer, film-maker, broadcaster and pataphysician. His many books include Constellation of Genius: 1922, Modernism, Year One, Bite: A Vampire Handbook and the official biography of Humphrey Jennings; he is co-editing Jennings’ epic work about the Industrial Revolution, Pandaemonium, for the Folio society. In 2015 he won the Perrot-Warrick Award to research the early history of Psychical Research. Previous books for Worple Press are A Ruskin Alphabet and The Verbals, a book long interview with Iain Sinclair.

Peter Kane Dufault

Peter Kane Dufault

Peter Kane Dufault (1923 – 2013) grew up in Westchester County, N.Y., and studied at Harvard. He graduated in 1947 and the first of his books of verse was published in 1954. He was variously employed as tree-surgeon, journalist, teacher, house-painter, pollster and, in 1968, he was a candidate for US Congress, running on the Liberal Party’s anti-Vietnam war platform; he was known locally as a fiddler, banjo-player and dance-caller. Poems have appeared in many magazines, including the New Yorker and London Magazine, and anthologies, including the 1996 Norton Anthology. Peter was well known for his live performances and was twice Visiting Poet at the Cheltenham Festival. A profile of Peter by Brad Leithauser can be read on the The New Yorker here.

Michael McKimm

Michael McKimm

Michael McKimm was born in Belfast in 1983 and grew up near the Giant’s Causeway. A graduate of the Warwick Writing Programme, he won an Eric Gregory Award in 2007 and was an International Writing Fellow at the University of Iowa in 2010. His debut collection is Still This Need (Heaventree Press, 2009) and he is published in the anthologies Best of Irish Poetry 2010 (Southword Editions, 2009), Best British Poetry 2012 (Salt, 2012) and Dear World & Everyone In It: new poetry in the UK (Bloodaxe, 2013), amongst others.  In 2012 he received a grant from Arts Council England to create a new series of poems addressing the geology of climate change, which formed the pamphlet Fossil Sunshine (Worple Press, 2013). www.michaelmckimm.co.uk

David Morley

David Morley

David Morley read Zoology at Bristol University, gained a fellowship from the Freshwater Biological Association and pursued research on acid rain. He co-founded the Writing Programme at the University of Warwick, of which he is now director, and develops and teaches new practices in scientific and creative writing. He co-edited The New Poetry for Bloodaxe and authored The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing. He has published nine collections of poetry; the latest, The Invisible Kings (Carcanet 2008) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation (photo copyright Jemimah Kuhfeld).

Carolyn Oulton

Carolyn Oulton

Carolyn Oulton is a Professor of Victorian Literature at Canterbury Christ Church University. She has previously published The Rain (Sol), Left Past the Moon (National Poetry Foundation) and A Child, a Death and the Making of the Fairy Tale Woman (Bewrite Books), as well as biographies of Mary Cholmondeley and Jerome K. Jerome.

Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson was born in Salford, Lancashire, in 1953, and grew up mainly in Liverpool. He co-edited the magazines Perfect Bound and Numbers while helping organize various Cambridge Poetry Festivals and a Poetry International at the South Bank Centre. His many volumes of poetry include a Selected Poems (2003), Ghost Characters (2006) and The Look of Goodbye (2008). He was awarded the Cheltenham Prize for This Other Life (1988). Both The Great Friend and Other Translated Poems (2002) and The Returning Sky (2012) were recommendations of the Poetry Book Society. A translator of poetry, mainly from the Italian, The Selected Poetry and Prose of Vittorio Sereni (with Marcus Perryman) appeared in 2006 and paperback in 2013. Read more »

Linda Saunders

Linda Saunders

Linda Saunders started her career as an art student, then changed direction to read English at Durham University. After a spell in the U.S., where her first son was born, she returned to Durham and taught literature courses for the Extra Mural department and the W.E.A. Later, her love of art and words came together in a career as a fine-arts journalist and editor; she was short-listed for the BP Arts Journalist of the Year award. Her poetry has been widely published in magazines and anthologies, including New Women Poets from Bloodaxe Books. A Touch on the Remote is her fourth book. Her first full-length collection, from Arrowhead Press, was short-listed for the Jerwood/Aldeburgh Prize. She now lives in Bath.

Joanna Seldon

Joanna Seldon (neé Pappworth) was brought up in South Hampstead and studied English at Oxford where she gained a high First and received her Doctorate for her work on Nathaniel Hawthorne. She went on to teach English at The Old Palace School in Croydon, James Allen’s Girls’ school in Dulwich, Brighton College and Wellington College. Her first book, By Word of Mouth, written with husband Anthony was published in 1983; Waterloo to Wellington was published in 2015; and The Whistleblower, which tells the story of the battle that her controversial father, Dr Maurice Pappworth, had with the medical establishment over experiments on human beings, will be published later this year. Joanna wrote three novels and several short stories, all of which can be found on her website. She was diagnosed with an incurable cancer in 2011, and lived with it bravely for five and a half years until her death at the end of 2016. Some of her finest poems are informed by her experience of cancer. She had three children (Jessica, Susie and Adam) with Anthony, to whom she was married for thirty four years.

Iain Sinclair

Iain Sinclair

Iain Sinclair is now firmly established as one of the most dazzlingly gifted and important of contemporary British writers. His wide-ranging recent work encompasses poetry (The Ebbing of KraftSaddling the Rabbit), fiction (Landor’s TowerDining on Stones), and documentary prose, including his best-selling Lights Out For the Territory and his M25 epic London Orbital.

Ben Smith

Ben Smith

Ben Smith’s poetry, criticism and short fiction has been published in a wide range of magazines, anthologies and journals. He completed a PhD on Environmental Poetry at Exeter University and currently lives in Devon.

Julian Stannard

Julian Stannard

Julian Stannard spent many years teaching American and English Literature at the University of Genoa. He has a PhD from UEA and is now a Reader in Creative Writing at the University of Winchester. Previous publications include Rina’s War (Peterloo, 2001), The Red Zone (Peterloo, 2007) and The Parrots of Villa Gruber Discover Lapis Lazuli (Salmon, 2011). He co-edited The Palm Beach Effect: Reflections on Michael Hofmann (CB Editions, 2013). He was awarded the Troubadour Prize in 2010 and reviews for the TLS, the Guardian and Poetry Review.

Clive Wilmer

Clive Wilmer

Clive Wilmer teaches at the University of Cambridge, where he is Emeritus Fellow in English at Sidney Sussex College and an Affiliated Lecturer in the Faculty of English. He is also an Honorary Fellow of Anglia Ruskin University. He has published six volumes of poetry, mostly with Carcanet Press, which in 2012 produced his New and Collected Poems. Collections of his poems has been published in Hungarian (2002) and in Spanish (2011); individual poems have been translated into Bulgarian, Italian and Swedish. Read more »

Anthony Wilson

Anthony Wilson

Anthony Wilson is a poet, writing tutor and lecturer at the University of Exeter. His books of poetry are Riddance (Worple Press, 2012), Full Stretch: Poems 1996-2006 (Worple Press, 2006), Nowhere Better Than This (Worple Press, 2002) and How Far From Here is Home? (Stride, 1996).  He is also the author of a prose memoir, Love for Now (Impress Books, 2012), detailing his experience of cancer.

Anthony has held writing residencies at The Poetry Society, The Times Educational Supplement, The Poetry Trust and Tate Britain, and he works as a tutor for the Arvon Foundation. He is editor of Creativity in Primary Education (Learning Matters, 2009), and co-editor of Making Poetry Matter (Continuum, 2013), and The Poetry Book for Primary Schools (Poetry Society, 1998). Read more »

Joseph Woods

Joseph Woods

Joseph Woods was born in Drogheda in 1966. He studied science and holds an MA in Creative Writing (Lancaster University). Widely published, he has read as far afield as Russia and India. In 2000 he won the Patrick Kavanagh Award. His first collection, Sailing to Hokkaido was published by Worple Press (2001), which was followed by Bearings in 2005.

Mary Woodward

Mary Woodward

Mary Woodward was born in Hammersmith to Irish and Welsh parents. As a child she lived in bomb-damaged Shepherds Bush, grew up on a council estate in Hertfordshire, and then studied in Liverpool. She has an English degree and a Master’s degree for research on William Morris’s early poetry from the University of Liverpool. She has worked in the Department of Education, and from 1979 to 2002 as a teacher in a comprehensive school; in 1993 she won the TES Teaching Poetry prize. After teaching HND Fashion students she went on to win the Guardian Jackie Moore Award for Fashion Writing in 2003. In 1993 she won the Poetry Business poetry competition and published Almost like Talking (Smith Doorstep). In 2008 she was awarded a place on a Poetry Trust First Collection seminar at Bruisyard Hall. Her poems have been in many magazines and frequently placed in competitions. She also has published short fiction. Two poems from The White Valentine (Worple, 2014) were Highly Commended in the Forward Prizes.

William Wootten

William Wootten

William Wootten grew up in Somerset, lives in London, and teaches at the University of Bristol.  He has written widely on modern poetry, his essays and book reviews appearing in publications such as the Guardian, the Times Literary Supplement, and the London Review of Books. He is also the author of the critical study, The Alvarez Generation: Thom Gunn, Geoffrey Hill, Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath and Peter Porter (Liverpool University Press, 2015).  His poems have appeared in magazines including PN Review, Poetry Review, the Spectator and the Times Literary Supplement.